Portraits

My images of some of the people I met at the Detroit Institute of Arts last weekend.

From top left to bottom right:

A Philosopher (about 1635) by José de Ribera
Two Jesters (1550-75) by Unknown artist
Self Portrait (1828) by Rembrandt Peale
Head of a Man (1777-78) John Singleton Copley
Girl Reading (1938) by Pablo Picasso
Self Portrait (1887) by Vincent Van Gogh

Cezanne

At the Art Institute.

From Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast :

p. 13
I was learning something from the painting of Cezanne that made writing simple true sentences far from enough to make the stories have the dimensions that I was trying to put in them. I was learning very much from him but I was not articulate enough to explain it to anyone. Besides it was a secret.

p. 69
I learned to understand Cezanne much better and to see truly how he made landscapes when I was hungry. I used to wonder if were hungry too when he painted; but I thought possibly it was only that he had forgotten to eat. It was one of those unsound but illuminating thoughts you have when you have been sleepless or hungry. Later I thought Cezanne was probably hungry in a different way.

Art in Bloom

On Thursday, we attended Art in Bloom at the Milwaukee Art Museum. If you read me regularly, you probably know how much I admire Anselm Kiefer’s painting, “Midgard.” The arrangement inspired by that painting easily secured my “people’s choice” vote.

At the Art Institute of Chicago

The above are my images of detail in several favorite works. Click to enlarge.

Earlier this month, we visited the Art Institute of Chicago for the first time since November 2019. In addition to the pleasures of returning to the old friends in this, one of our favorite places in the greatest city in the world, this introvert enjoyed the non-existent crowds on that warm, sunny Saturday.

At the Milwaukee Art Museum

It has been nearly two years since we last visited the Milwaukee Art Museum. We had the place practically to ourselves yesterday.

At the University of Michigan Museum of Art

I captured the images above during a recent visit. From the top left:

1. Detail from Jacopo del Casentino’s Enthroned Madonna and Child with Saints and Angels (circa 1325)
2. Detail from Eastman Johnson’s Boyhood of Lincoln (1868)
3. Detail from James McNeill Whistler’s Sea and Rain (1865)
4. Detail from John Francis Murphy’s Landscape (1880)
5. Detail from Max Ernst’s At the Crossroads (1955)
6. Two Girls Reading (Pablo Picasso; 1934)

Museum of Fine Arts

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51A7E010-2846-4152-9634-AD181FB273B0A few more photos captured on my recent trip to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Morning Sunlight on the Snow, Éragny-sur-Epte; Camille Pissarro, 1895
Seacoast at Trouville; Claude Monet, 1881
Seascape II; Hyman Bloom, 1974
Endlessly Repeating Twentieth Century Modernism; Josiah McElheny, 2007
■ Olmec mask; 900–600 BC
South Sea Whale Fishing II; Robert Salmon, 1831