Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

437E039F-306E-4BC9-B510-248A1F675530

Detail from Seacoast at Trouville (Claude Monet; 1881)

8682428C-A8F6-4DC0-B2F0-017215BDC315

Detail from Summer Night’s Dream (The Voice) (Edward Munch; 1893)

C6DD4A0B-7475-4DE1-BF08-C1A8C21B7715

Detail from Ravine (Vincent Van Gogh; 1889)

554BA3DD-F6E3-4106-83CA-721AC48C3249

I Dreamed I Could Fly (Jonathan Borofsky; 2000) put me in mind of the ceremony in the cheesy but frightening sci-fi flick Logan’s Run.

5B45C777-1625-4E31-B6E0-586939742801

Detail from Jackson Pollock’s Mural (1943)

EC4E015E-7BDC-4933-824E-905563D735D7

An Olmec mask

FDE81A1A-6DE0-488B-9C17-B3FC73FF52F0

Detail from Double Portrait (Max Beckmann; 1946)

All of the above are images I took during a recent visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Spring

B246E2B7-50E7-4D2D-973E-3012581AE397

Detail of Norman Lewis’ “Afternoon” (1969).

I captured the above image last month at the Smart Museum of Art. Don’t the colors and composition feel like spring? Family geocaching adventures bookended our youngest’s spring break, and during both hikes, we were rewarded with the blue skies and bright yellow sun that this painting evokes. My older daughter and I are on break this week, so we returned to the purported location of the last geocache to see if we could solve the mystery. Alas, no; the site has been temporarily disabled until it can be replaced. We relished sun on our faces, though, and the hint of warmth in the wind.

Genuine interest in art

482E7CB0-8579-4DFC-ABF9-31679866F1E2

Detail of Leonardo Drew’s “Number 185” (2016).

Earlier this month, we visited the Smart Museum of Art before seeing Photograph 51 at the Court. From a distance, the piece pictured above looked to me as if it had been blackened in a fire.

Other notes: Once I finished Parks and Recreation, I moved on to The Good Place and now must wait until fall for new episodes. Related: We had breakfast-for-lunch at the Ron Swanson-inspired Whisk last weekend. It was so awesome that it has effectively ruined our local breakfast nooks for us. And speaking of ruining things for us, William Hootkins ((Moby Dick) and Nick Offerman (Lincoln in the Bardo) set the bar for audiobook narration so high that nearly every other narrator is a disappointment. (And, yes, we loved learning that Offerman is an Illini, too.)

To bring this post home, Ron Swanson on art:

Okay, everyone! SHUT UP and LOOK AT ME! Welcome to Visions of Nature. This room has several paintings in it. Some are big; some are small. People did them, and they are here now. I believe that after this is over, they’ll be hung in government buildings. Why the government is involved in an art show is beyond me. I also think it’s pointless for a human to paint scenes of nature when they can just go outside and stand in it. Anyway, please do not misinterpret the fact that I am talking right now as genuine interest in art and attempt to discuss it with me further. End of speech.